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Five Things Your Resume Must Convey In 10 Seconds
Date created: 16/02/2015
If you pitch your resume into Black Hole recruiting sites, youíll be resting your job-search hopes on a keyword-searching algorithm. Thatís why I donít recommend that approach to job-seekers, no matter how closely a job-seekerís resume matches the posted job spec. I recommend that you reach out to your hiring manager directly with a Pain Letter and Human-Voiced Resume sent straight to the hiring managerís desk. Your Pain Letter will speak so directly to your target hiring managerís specific issues that your resume is sure to get a look if the manager opens the envelope at all. Thatís why we write ultra-targeted Pain Letters versus boring, boilerplate cover letters. That being said, your resume still has its own heavy lifting to do. In the typical ten-second glance, your resume has to convey at least these five critical points: Your resume has to convey the fact you know exactly what sort of pain your hiring manager is facing. You may have written the best Pain Letter in the world, but you still have to get across in your resume the idea that you understand exactly what your next manager needs to have done. Letís say youíre going after a Business Development role. Your Pain Letter makes it crystal clear that you understand the challenges associated with selling a brand-new cloud software application to mid-market businesses. Luckily, thatís what youíve been doing for the past five years, very successfully. Still, your career history includes a wide range of selling experiences, not just in the software realm and not just for startups. When your manager flips your Pain Letter to see your Human-Voiced Resume just behind and stapled to it, s/he has to see immediately that youíre the kind of Business Development person who can step right into the organization and get the sales pipeline activated.The number one thing you want to get across to your next manager is your story. Thereís nothing wrong with your story, no matter what twists and turns youíve taken to get here. When you can see the soundness and logic in your path, other people will too. Donít hide your story and make your manager hunt for dates and titles and the chronological aspect of your career. Thatís the part theyíre most avid to know! Your resume has to tell Dragon-Slaying Stories. Your former titles and the dates of your past positions are important to give your hiring manager the broad outline of your career to date. Inside that outline, he or she wants to know what youíve left in your wake at each past job. You can make it easy for him or her to do that by telling short Dragon-Slaying Stories in your resume, like this: After our acquisition of Angry Chocolates, I led the integration of the two firmsí databases for customer, vendor and product information in three weeks without affecting our day-to-day processes on either side. The reader of your resume wants proof that you know whatís up and how to deal with the curve balls life throws at us. You can share that proof in quick Dragon-Slaying Stories that tell us all we need to know to pick up the phone and call you! Your resume has to prove that youíre human. Apart from their value as Ďproof pointsí for your hiring managerís benefit, thereís another big benefit to Dragon-Slaying Stories and the Human-Voiced Resume format in general. The other benefit is that when you write your resume in a human voice, your manager instantly knows that s/heís dealing with a living, breathing person rather than a corporate automaton or an empty suit. The more personality and spark you can put into your resume, beginning with the Summary at the top of it, the better. If your hiring manager reads your resume and knows immediately that a coffee date or phone call with you is going to be lively and intellectually stimulating, youíre going to get a lot more responses. You might feel like youíre taking a risk putting a human voice in your resume, but thatís only because weíve been trained to write resumes for automated recruiting portals rather than for humans. When you know that youíre writing to a person at his desk (or hers), itís much easier and more fun to use a conversational tone.The reception to your Pain Letter/Human-Voiced Resume combo is going to be more human, too ó and the resulting conversation when the two of your connect will make sparks fly! Iíll be rooting for you. Dig your sparkly, behind-the-suit personality out of mothballs and bring it across in your Pain Letter and Human-Voiced Resume. Wait until you see what happens next!.. read more

Sell Yourself in Your Resume
Date created: 27/10/2014
Anyone involved in a job search is just like selling your credentials (in the right spirit). Itís important for everyone to understand that your resume is marketing tool for what you want the company to buy Ė and thatís YOU! Take an honest look at your existing Resume. Does your resume talk too much about what you are looking for and not enough about what your ROI to the company may be? Donít include an objective/benefit you hope to obtain from the position. The potential employer wants to hire someone who can be a value add & contribute in the overall growth of the organization. For an effective resume, one needs to demonstrate key strengths rather than telling about them. You want your explanation to describe your strengths and present your ability to add value in a way that only you can deliver! You have to grab the hiring managerís attention in those first few words, so make them count! Be certain to highlight your unique strengths and accomplishments instead using objective at the top of your resume. Use Industry key words in this area. Please ensure to back up this introduction with the relevant details that tell your story. Before sending it out, try reading it as if it was not your personal history. Are you able to tell what your target position is from the resume? Are you the right fitment for the role basis the JD and the profile that you have created? We all know that there is not enough space to tell complete history in the resume but it needs to be a brief sales pitch thatís effective enough to impress the prospective employer so that they shortlist and call you for Personal interview. Please ensure that your resume should not be having too many bullets and description? You should always keep in mind the sales points you want your resume to communicate to the reader as you revise your documents. Marketing experts know that the message has to be consistent and targeted to be remembered. Apply the same strategy to your resume to create the impression you want. Is your resume unique in how it presents your career progression? Hiring managers want to hear your story and a demonstration of your achievements. They are not looking for a story-book Ė no visual aids required! Finally, show that you have the range to meet the basic needs described in the position qualifications, as well as the strategies necessary to deliver. Make certain that your resume communicates your potential value to the employer. Use your research on the position and the company to align your strengths with their needs. With the right marketing in your resume, there will be no question that you are the ONLY candidate who can meet their requirements. The hiring manager will be picking up the phone to call you after reading your ResumeÖI can assure you that !!.. read more

RC Western Railway Ė 5775 Helper & Trackman Posts 2013:
Date created: 11/12/2013
RC Western Railway Ė 5775 Helper & Trackman Posts 2013: Total No. of Vacancies: 5775 Name of the Posts: 1. Gangman/ Trackman (B 1): 3534 Posts 2. Helper/ Khalasi (Engg/ Mech/ Elect/ S&T) B 1: 932 Posts 3. Helper-II/ Khalasi (Engg/ Mech/ Elect/ S&T) C 1: 662 Posts 4. Helper-II/ Khallasi (TMC Organization) B 1: 52 Posts 5. Platform Porter (A 2): 595 Posts Age Limit: Candidates age limit is 18-33 years for UR, 18-36 years for OBC & 18-38 years for SC/ ST candidates as on 01-01-2014. Educational Qualification: Candidates must pass minimum 10th class/ ITI or equivalent from recognized Educational Institution/ Board. Examination Fee: Candidates has to pay Rs.100/- through Indian Postal Order drawn in favour of ĎAssistant Personnel Officer (Recruitment), RRC-WRí & payable at Mumbai. Candidates belonging to SC/ ST, Ex-Servicemen For Employment Notification Click On - http://www.rrc-wr.com/PDF%20Files/Notification_2_2013.pdf For Application Format Click on- http://www.rrc-wr.com/PDF%20Files/Annxure1_%20App_Format.pdf Pay Scale- Pay Band I of Rs.5200-20200 with grade pay Rs. 1800/- Last date of application-14.01.2014. Last date for remote area-29.10.2014... read more

National Portal of India
Date created: 09/02/2013
http://india.gov.in, the National Portal of India
http://india.gov.in, the National Portal of India .. read more

http://rti.gov.in/
Date created: 08/02/2013
Web Site RTI Link 1 Cabinet Secretariat http://cabsec.nic.in/ RTI Link 2 Comptroller & Auditor General http://www.cag.gov.in/ RTI Link 3 Department of Atomic Energy http://www.dae.gov.in RTI Link 4 Department of Space http://www.isro.gov.in RTI Link 5 Election Commission of India http://eci.nic.in RTI Link 6 Ministry of Agriculture 7 Ministry of Chemicals & Fertilizers 8 Ministry of Civil Aviation http://moca.gov.in RTI Link 9 Ministry of Coal http://coal.gov.in/ RTI Link 10 Ministry of Commerce & Industry 11 Ministry of Communications & Information Tech. http://www.mit.gov.in/ RTI Link 12 Ministry of Consumer Aff., Food, & Public Dist. http://fcamin.nic.in/dfpd_html/index.asp RTI Link 13 Ministry of Corporate Affairs http://www.mca.gov.in/ RTI Link 14 Ministry of Culture http://ccrtindia.gov.in/ RTI Link 15 Ministry of Defence http://mod.nic.in/ RTI Link 16 Ministry of Development of North Eastern Region http://www.northeast.nic.in RTI Link 17 Ministry of Drinking Water and Sanitation http://ddws.nic.in/ RTI Link 18 Ministry of Earth Sciences http://www.moes.gov.in/ RTI Link 19 Ministry of Environment & Forests http://www.envfor.nic.in/ RTI Link 20 Ministry of External Affairs http://mea.gov.in RTI Link 21 Ministry of Finance http://finmin.nic.in/ 22 Ministry of Food Processing Industries http://mofpi.nic.in RTI Link 23 Ministry of Health & Family Welfare http://www.mohfw.nic.in/ RTI Link 24 Ministry of Heavy Industry & Public Enterprises http://dhi.nic.in/ RTI Link 25 Ministry of Home Affairs http://www.mha.nic.in/ RTI Link 26 Ministry of Housing & Urban Poverty Alleviation http://mhupa.gov.in RTI Link 27 Ministry of Human Resource Development http://www.education.nic.in/ RTI Link 28 Ministry of Information & Broadcasting http://mib.nic.in/ RTI Link 29 Ministry of Labour & Employment http://www.cbwe.gov.in 30 Ministry of Law & Justice http://lawmin.nic.in/ RTI Link 31 Ministry of Micro, Small and Medium Enterprises http://www.trtcguwahati.org RTI Link 32 Ministry of Mines http://mines.nic.in/ RTI Link 33 Ministry of Minority Affairs http://www.minorityaffairs.gov.in RTI Link 34 Ministry of New & Renewable Energy http://www.mnre.gov.in/ RTI Link 35 Ministry of Overseas Indian Affairs http://moia.gov.in/ RTI Link 36 Ministry of Panchayati Raj http://panchayat.nic.in/ RTI Link 37 Ministry of Parliamentary Affairs http://mpa.nic.in/ RTI Link 38 Ministry of Personnel, Public Grievances & Pensions http://persmin.gov.in RTI Link 39 Ministry of Petroleum & Natural Gas http://www.petroleum.nic.in RTI Link 40 Ministry of Power http://powermin.gov.in RTI Link 41 Ministry of Railways http://www.indianrailways.gov.in RTI Link 42 Ministry of Road Transport & Highways http://morth.nic.in RTI Link 43 Ministry of Rural Development http://rural.nic.in/ RTI Link 44 Ministry of Science & Technology http://dst.gov.in/ RTI Link 45 Ministry of Shipping http://shipping.nic.in/ RTI Link 46 Ministry of Social Justice & Empowerment http://socialjustice.nic.in RTI Link 47 Ministry of Statistics & Programme Implementation http://mospi.gov.in/ RTI Link 48 Ministry of Steel http://steel.gov.in/ RTI Link 49 Ministry of Textiles http://www.texmin.nic.in/ RTI Link 50 Ministry of Tourism http://tourism.nic.in RTI Link 51 Ministry of Tribal Affairs http://tribal.nic.in/ RTI Link 52 Ministry of Urban Development http://www.cpwd.gov.in RTI Link 53 Ministry of Water Resources http://mowr.gov.in RTI Link 54 Ministry of Women & Child Development http://wcd.nic.in/ RTI Link 55 Ministry of Youth Affairs & Sports http://yas.nic.in RTI Link 56 Planning Commission http://planningcommission.gov.in/ RTI Link 57 President http://www.rashtrapatisachivalaya.gov.in/ RTI Link.. read more

Links
Date created: 14/10/2011
Our Partner Links http://india.gov.in, the National Portal of India
http://india.gov.in, the National Portal of India .. read more

INTERVIEW QUESTIONS BY MNC
Date created: 04/08/2011
Large Set of Interview Questions of different subjects, Which has been asked in actual MNC Companies Interviews. Visit http://www.coolinterview.com/ now to update your Knowledge of Interview Questions. The CoolInterview will help you to take away your fear about the Interviews in MNC Companies. http://www.coolinterview.com/ We strongly recommend you to take full advantage from Website and recommend your friends also to do so... read more

Important Links http://www.india.gov.in
Date created: 10/11/2009
This section provides you with information and useful links to avail various Citizen Services being provided by the Central & State/UT Governments in India . The list, however, is not exhaustive, as we are committed to adding more and more information about other services for which citizens and other stakeholders need to interact with the Government. Keep visiting this section for new updates !! Obtain: Birth Certificate http://www.india.gov.in/howdo/howdoi.php?service=1 Caste Certificate http://www.india.gov.in/howdo/howdoi.php?service=4 Tribe Certificate Domicile Certificate http://www.india.gov.in/howdo/otherservice_details.php?service=8 Driving Licence http://www.india.gov.in/howdo/howdoi.php?service=6 Marriage Certificate http://www.india.gov.in/howdo/howdoi.php?service=3 Death Certificate http://www.india.gov.in/howdo/howdoi.php?service=2 Search More - How do I http://www.india.gov.in/howdo/advancedsearch.php.. read more

What is the Difference Between a CV and a Resume?
Date created: 08/07/2009
What is the Difference Between a CV and a Resume? By Sam Roberts Is there a difference? I imagine that many people, on reading the title of this article, laughed smugly to themselves, then wandered off thinking vague thoughts about the English and Americans having different names for the same thing. If you were one of these people, then don't worry - you're right! Or at least you're partially right. In general, CVs are used throughout most of the world, while resumes are the common format in America. However, there are significant differences between the two documents, and if you plan to succeed in the employment market it is important that you are familiar with the features and uses of both. Let's go through them one at a time. The differences in brief At first glance, the differences between the two seem slight. Both consist of a structured list of facts that allows you to impart relevant information about your skills and achievements to an employer as quickly and simply as possible. Although in essence they both serve the same purpose, the main difference between a CV and a resume is that a CV acts as a complete record of your professional history, while a resume is a short, targeted list of transferable skills and accomplishments, intended to show how you can be of specific benefit to the particular company to which you are applying.. As I mentioned earlier, throughout most of the world, the CV is the standard format for job applications. However, in the US, resumes are more common, and CVs are reserved almost completely for jobs in academia or when applying for grants. As a result, many international workers possess both a CV and a resume and choose between them as necessary. In the following sections, I shall discuss the features of each type of document in more detail, and close with a brief look at how to decide which one is best for you. Features of a CV A CV, or Curriculum Vitae, to give it its Latin name, is an account of your entire education and employment history. The term translates as 'course of life', and it really is that - a record of your working life so far. It is far more detailed than a resume, from which elements are often excluded if they are considered irrelevant. A CV should include everything you've ever done, listed in reverse chronological order, to make it easier to prioritise more recent information. As a result, a CV is longer than a resume, although two pages is the recommended length. Information in a CV is arranged according to subheadings, to make it easier for the reader to quickly skim through and find the information he or she needs. Remember, your CV is intended to let prospective employers find out about you in the hope that they will offer you a job, so it's in your interest to make it easy to understand! The sections of a CV may include the following, although many sections can be moved up or down depending on what information is relevant for the specific job. Profile/Objectives - a short statement, tailored to fit the requirements of the prospective employer; Education/Qualifica tions - a list of institutions and courses, with grades awarded and dates attended; Skills/Competencies - any skills or achievements that are relevant to the job. You can include most things, but be sensible - there is no need to mention the 10m swimming badge you got when you were six! Career Summary - this should be the most detailed part, it can be moved higher up the document if necessary. Each job should have a short description of the skills you used and your achievements within the role. A few bullet points are sufficient, with more detailed accounts of more recent/relevant positions. Features of a resume A resume should be a shorter, more focused account of your relevant skills and achievements. Although the exact length of a resume is open to debate, in general it should not exceed one page in length, and it's safer to be conventional; after all, you want to get the job. It's fine to miss things out of a resume to keep the length down; you should only include the things that are most relevant to the position you are targeting. Resumes also often miss out some of the more personal details that CVs include, such as hobbies and interests. As with CVs, resumes are usually organised into a few essential sections. However, one key difference between a CV and a resume is that resumes are focused on your skills and accomplishments, rather than providing an objective account of your history. As a result, resumes often feature aggrandising language, and tend to be more obviously self-promoting than CVs. You can afford to be a bit less formal with the structure of a resume than with a CV, and there is a wider scope for creative presentation. That said, there are three main formats that are generally used: Chronological - this is the most common format, and is very similar in organisation to a CV; Functional - your skills/qualificatio ns act as a backbone, around which the rest of the resume is structured; Focused - as above, but with the content organised in relation to the targeted position. It is often better to stick to one of these tried and tested formats than to attempt to wow an employer with your own unique design. These have a chance of backfiring if your reader doesn't like them, so why take the risk? The only time I could see the point of designing your own format is if you are entering a creative field, such as design. What to use, and when to use it The general rule to go by here is that if you are in America, use a resume, and if you are anywhere else in the world, use a CV. However, if you are applying for an academic position, or for a grant, it is better to send a CV, regardless of where you are. Things are further complicated by the rising popularity in the UK of short CVs, which, at less than two pages, are confusingly similar to a resume. One of the main reasons to have a short CV was to stand out from the crowd, but almost everybody follows this model and it no longer has the same impact as it used to. As a result, the old style of CV is making a comeback, for the same reasons that it disappeared in the first place.. Whether you choose to follow the trend, or stick with convention is up to you. Personally, I have both kinds, and I decide which version to send out on a per-company basis. In fact, it is safer to make two versions anyway. Set aside some time and write yourself both a CV and a resume; it doesn't take much effort, and it means that you'll always have the correct document to hand, whatever you are asked for. You can even hire a copywriting agency to do it for you. Copywriters write both CVs and resumes on a regular basis, and will be familiar with the conventions of each. If you don't want to pay for a copywriter, have a look at some CV and resume samples and use them to help you write your own. You'd be surprised how many people don't know the difference between a CV and a resume. Whichever one you decide to go for, follow the conventions and write to the strengths of your chosen format, and the interviews should come flooding in. You'll soon be on your way to that dream job... read more

Top 20 Interview Questions
Date created: 29/04/2009
Please find the below mentioned Top 20 Interview Questions to get through the interview process 1. How does your job fit in to your department and company? 2. Give an example of when you have worked under pressure? 3. What kinds of people do you like working with? 4. Give me an example of when your work was criticized? 5. Give me an example of when you have felt anger at work. How did you cope and did you still perform a good job? 6. What kind of people do you find it difficult to work with? 7. Give me an example of when you have had to face a conflict of interest at work? 8. Tell me about the last time you disagreed with your boss? 9. Give me an example of when you havenít got on with others? 10. Do you prefer to work alone or in a group? Why? 11. This organization is very different to your current employer - how do you think you are going to fit in? 12. What are you looking for in a company? 13. How do you measure your own performance? 14. What kind of pressures have you encountered at work? 15. Are you a self-starter? Give me examples to demonstrate this? 16. What changes in the workplace have caused you difficulty and why? 17. How do you feel about working long hours and/or weekends? 18. Give me an example of when you have been out of your depth? 19. What have you failed to achieve to date? 20. What can you bring to this organization? .. read more

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